Dangers of driving after consuming edible or drinkable cannabis

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Dangers of driving after consuming edible or drinkable cannabis

Driving under the influence of drugs is both unlawful and dangerous. Even if everything you consumed before getting behind the wheel was legal and as seemingly innocent as a brownie ⁠— with a special ingredient.

No matter how colorful, fruity and fun a few cannabis energy drinks or gummy bears seem, if you plan to drive after consuming them, then you should be aware of their effects. Driving after ingesting cannabis products can impair your driving ability and leave you with long-lasting legal consequences.

How is it different than smoking marijuana?

Whether you’re anxious to try a new marijuana edible from your favorite dispensary or try something your friend offers you at a party, you have the privilege to do so in California. But, according to the Center for Disease Control, smoking marijuana produces quicker effects on your body, while edibles take longer to digest and produce a high.

This delayed high can lead individuals to consuming a lot of edibles at once without realizing the consequences until later. It’s worth making sure you have a sober ride home as a small dose of THC can already make it hard to focus. And if you wind up consuming a high dose of THC, you could experience panic attacks, paranoia and psychotic reactions.

How much is too much?

Unlike alcohol, there is no exact limit of how much marijuana is too much marijuana when it comes to driving. And even though there are studies that show drivers who use marijuana can drive safely, you can still face a DUI under current state laws.

It’s important to keep in mind that any kind of impaired driving can put you and those around you in danger. And that a marijuana DUI charge can leave you with serious penalties, like jail, driver’s license suspension and large fines.

When you use legal cannabis products, a little bit of caution can go a long way. Especially since a night of edible experimentation — accidental or purposeful — can leave you with criminal charges.

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